Pound Farm, Maristow, Devon

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Grade II Listed Barns,Natural England,Restoration,Barns,Tamar Valley,AONB,Maristow Estate,vernacular architecture,west devon,Maristow,Pound Farm,Devon,Delabole scantle slates,lime and horsehair,Kiln-dried oak windows,traditional scarfed joints Grade II Listed Barns,Natural England,Restoration,Barns,Tamar Valley,AONB,Maristow Estate,vernacular architecture,west devon,Maristow,Pound Farm,Devon,Delabole scantle slates,lime and horsehair,Kiln-dried oak windows,traditional scarfed joints

Grade II Listed Barns Natural England Repair

Pound Farm is set within the Tamar valley AONB and operates as a successful working farm for The Maristow Estate. This project was partly funded by Natural England to ensure that the restoration techniques used were faithful to the vernacular architecture of West Devon.

We were fully involved throughout, including significant amounts of time on site, working closely with the craftsmen to conserve these classic agricultural buildings, namely a threshing barn, stables and shippon.

The roofs are all new Delabole scantle slates, hand-cut with close mitred corners and laid in diminishing courses. Fixed with oak pegs to lath battens and then a torched underside ceiling with lime and horsehair. New pentice slate roofs protect the threshing barn doors from prevailing wind and rain.

Kiln-dried oak windows, shutters and floors - all roof timbers cut with hand adze tools and traditional scarfed joints.

Damaged stonework has been stitched, lime pointed and infilled with salvaged local stone quoins.

Attention was also given to regional wildlife through the provision of habitats for owls, bats, swallows... even insects and lichen clinging to the earth and lime puttied walls.

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